Final Exam

1. Final revision of Sociology Report Brief

multilinguasim-study-eng-201

2. Toulmin Method of Analysis

Seeing as I just revised my Sociology Report again, I’ll analyze it with the toulmin method.

Claim:

The claim or idea I intend my audience to accept is that “I believe it (multilingualism) is possessing the knowledge to communicate to multiple different audiences effective and efficiently.”

Evidence:

In order to prove and convince the audience of my claim I underwent a short study observing myself and the different of dialects I can interact with. I present the percentage of time I spent in one day interacting in each of four different dialects. I also created a simple graph that allows the audience to easily interpret my findings.

Warrant:

The warrant I present linking my claim and evidence is simply my interpretation of my findings. I explain that out of four broad dialects the least used was still used ten percent of the time shows the importance of using different languages, even the less popular ones.

Backing:

My backing piggy-backs on my main warrant by going into further example as to how important every moment of communication is important and how even an instant of language confusion can disrupt an encounter or harm a reputation.

I think my claim and evidence are the start to a great argument, although more evidence would make it easier to develop a better warrant and backing. I still feel my warrant is also quite adequate but provides a poor foundation to build a solid backing on.

3. Rhetorical Analysis of Literacy Ad Rationale 

Purpose:

The purpose of my ad is to inform about the insufficient support young children are receiving in public schools.

Audience:

My audience I wished to reach would be the parents of young children. I feel this can be seen by the text on my ad that reads “What does your child deserve?” obviously reaching for a parents attention.

Stance:

My stance as the creator of the ad would be something like urgent and concerned. The fact that American grade school students literacy rates is dropping substantially concerns me as a fellow American who wants the best for our country but also as wishful future parent.

Genre:

The genre is obviously an advertisement. I can also describe it as persuasive or possible a call to action type of ad.

Media/ Design:

The design is appropriate due to the bright eye catching color and authentic hand drawn aspects. What the ad shows and attempts to say is amplified due to the appearance of being drawn by a child (obviously done on purpose and in no way the maximum ability of the artist).

4. Extended Key Term Applications

  1.  Reference is a versatile term in the world of academia because of its ability to be both a noun and a verb. A reference can be any type of material, not your own, which provides valuable knowledge that an author chooses to use.  I’m sure that someone from class, possibly myself, asked “Professor, how many references do we need?” Obviously inquiring about the amount of sources we needed for an assignment. The noun and verb uses of the word essentially go hand in hand. To reference, simply means to cite or to give credit. Confusion can occur when using them together for example, “how should I reference this reference?” Or in other words, “how should I give credit to this source?” While a potentially confusing term, if used correctly one will be viewed, at the very least, as competent. I used references in every project of this course because they are always necessary unless writing about something you are an expert in. In my Literacy Narrative I referenced two projects from students who had previously completed the assignment. The Sociology Brief required me to reference an article that defined key terms necessary to accomplish the project. The Literacy Ad needed information about the American literacy rate, a statistic I did not know, in order to look and sound convincing as well as correct.
  2. Tone, like many words, has multiple definitions or uses depending on the context. In a literature context tone is defined as an attitude an author takes towards the subject they’re writing about. There are a multitude if tones an author can display, serious, playful, formal, ironic, etc. If happen to hear the “tone” in a gym though, it would probably be in reference to the definition of one’s body or muscles. To avoid an awkward conversation refrain from bringing up the tone of an author while talking to a meathead at the gym. The tone of each of my projects for this course were each specific to their assignment. For the Literacy Narrative my tone was critical as well as clarifying, since I both had to assess my skills as a writer while trying to explain the reasons I did things in my previous works. The Sociology Brief ‘s tone was much more formal and analytical because of its parameters as a scientific study. The tone of the Literacy Ad was much more personal because of my own opinion of the U.S. literacy epidemic.
  3. An audience is often thought of as the people who laugh on late night talk shows or everyone watching a movie at the theater. In writing an audience is still very a similar idea. Just like in movies or shows the author is writing to appeal to a particular group of people. The audience is just who the author feels will best receive their ideas and the author writes accordingly. Even though I was writing all my papers for my professor to grade the audience of each were all different. The Literacy Ad’s audience are parents of public school students, the Literacy Narrative actually was my Professor and the Sociology brief was meant to target American citizens interested in multilingualism.
  4. Logos, my personal favorite way to persuade someone, is the use of logic or reason in order to convince someone of an idea. The use of pathos (emotion) and ethos (reputation) are also important persuaders, but if legitimate logos are present then the other two are unnecessary. The use of logic and reason cannot ever be a bad strategy. The project that required the least amount of logos was the Literacy Narrative because it discussed my opinions about how I felt I can improve as a writer. The Sociology Brief and Literacy Ad required much more logical reasoning due to their persuasive and argumentative natures, which came in the form of statistics and personal observation.
  5. Primary source or resource is a text that was made author that is referencing it. A great example of such a resource would be earlier in the class when each student had to refer to multiple pieces of their own work in our literacy narrative papers. This type of source can be easily confused with a secondary source, which is using another person’s idea to prove a point. The Literacy Ad had no true primary source unless, the hand drawn picture counts. Both the Literacy Narrative and Sociology Brief used primary sources in the form of my previous writing samples and the data I recorded about languages.

5. Intervention

Changing my Writing Process

Overall I feel the alterations to my writing process have had the largest impact on the quality of my writing. The way I was required to start in the middle of my Literacy Narrative and explain my thoughts and explanations before developing a thesis, allowed for a free flow of ideas (not being swayed to conform to my thesis) as well as the creation of a thesis that could perfectly encompass my main points since they were there to reference. This process happened again in both of the final projects just in different ways. In the Literacy Ad I first created my advertisement which took a lot of thought about what I wished to display. This prior work made explaining my ad in the rationale much easier to accomplish. The Sociology Brief also required prerequisite work in the form of recording data. The data recorded provided a layout for the paper as well as revealed the argument I intended on making.

 

SENTENCE WORK

Original piece:

Personally, I felt that I put very little effort into the paper due to the many restrictions a formal essay demands. I would often become so concerned in my grammar and sentence structure that I did not provide enough attention to my content. The paper was also assigned two days before it was due, which for me is a short time to write, so my grammar suffered as well.

Edited version:

I put very little effort into the paper due to the many restrictions a formal essay demands. I would often become so concerned with my grammar and sentence structure that I provided little attention to my content. Even with my intense attempt to be grammatically correct, the two day time frame to complete the assignment caused multiple grammar errors.

Semicolon & Colon Work-

He woke up on the day of the race feeling under the weather; his parents advised him to forfeit the race.

His headache was distracting him when the starting gun went off; thus, he did poorly and placed low in finishing position.

The finishing positions of the race were: Smith, Green, Parker, Link, Pound and Johansson.

 

REFLECTIVE WRITING

1. Reflection on Literacy Narrative

I learned that the narrative genre could be a more relaxed form of writing that has more to do with the writer’s opinions and analysis. The audience I wrote this narrative for my professor in order to explain my literacy journey and I made sure to explain my ideas in a way that shows my strengths and how I have grown. Theme and purpose hold extreme power over a paper and its message. Developing a theme can make or break a paper. Rhetorical analysis is a necessity when using and describing another piece of work. The three methods were all very helpful but I personally liked the first method we learned the most because it had the most sections and analyzed the deepest. Rubric reflection: literacy-narrative-rubric

2. Primary Research

This project, centered around primary research, was a new experience for me. Being able to spend more time analyzing my own data and not sifting through sources that may or may not produce relevant information was nice. Evaluating my own data was difficult because I had to step back and read my work as if I had never seen it before. I could not assume another reader to interpret my work the same as me so I had to evaluate it as it was, not as I meant for it to be.  I learned that being over critical of yourself will only help you in the long run as well as produce more positive reviews of your work if the critiques are accurate.  I found the process to be more rewarding than other papers due to being required to analyze myself and figure ways to strengthen my weaknesses.

3. Sentences

“Writing style and a writers voice come from his/her sentence construction.” I believe this statement is correct because the construction of sentences is really the only part of any paper that can’t be repeated exactly. If you give two people, or a class of 20 let’s say, the exact same prompt for a paper and even give them the same sources the largest difference with each paper will be the way sentences are set up. Either than how the paper is arranged overall, sentences are where you get to meet the writer. Take myself for example, I think I use an above average amount sentences that use a comma to pause in a connected thought. When you look at different styles of writing like poetry, professional or free verse (journal) writing, the sentence structure is what determines what style it is. Poems often have no rules or required sentence structure, the same with free verse writing but even these differ in that free verse often still follows the standard f containing independent clauses. Professional writing is scrutinized heavily on the rules to form a correct sentence. No matter who the audience or the type of writing you’re doing sentence construction determines your voice and style.

4. Toulmin Analysis of Sociology Brief

Claim: The claim or idea I intend my audience to accept is that “I believe it (multilingualism) is possessing the knowledge to communicate to multiple different audiences effective and efficiently.”

Evidence: In order to prove and convince the audience of my claim I underwent a short study observing myself and the different of dialects I can interact with. I present the percentage of time I spent in one day interacting in each of four different dialects. I also created a simple graph that allows the audience to easily interpret my findings.

Warrant: The warrant I present linking my claim and evidence is simply my interpretation of my findings. I explain that out of four broad dialects the least used was still used ten percent of the time shows the importance of using different languages, even the less popular ones.

Backing: My backing piggy-backs on my main warrant by going into further example as to how important every moment of communication is important and how even an instant of language confusion can disrupt an encounter or harm a reputation. I think my claim and evidence are the start to a great argument, although more evidence would make it easier to develop a better warrant and backing. I still feel my warrant is also quite adequate but provides a poor foundation to build a solid backing on. After developing the method of beginning to write about my main points and pieces of evidence and then producing a thesis from the Literacy Narrative, I decided to continue with it and test my ability again.

5. Print Ad Audience

The intended audience of any piece of literature or advertisement has a great influence over all aspects including the media/design. My intended audience of grade school student’s parents makes me think about how I can try to reach them through their instinctual love for their children. For this paper, about U.S. literacy, I want to plant questions into parents minds about the education their child is getting. A good way to catch attention would also be to use an authentic drawing that may possibly remind the parent of their child’s own artwork. The two pieces from my last English class that I analyzed in my Literacy Narrative, were different simply due to their audience. Both were meant to be read by my Professor, yet for the journal I knew he would look at purely content while the paper would be graded on both content as well as proper structure and construction. For the journal I let my ideas flow with little concern about grammatical errors or paragraph structure, but the formal paper required a more refined and professional design.

6. Three Influential parts of the Course

a. Reviewing and having access to previous students projects helped me form an initial idea of how my papers should look. Being able to see in a way what the professor is expecting from me is very beneficial.

b. Peer reviewing the work of others, quite like reviewing previous students works, allows me to see what my peers felt was necessary to say and do. Also reviewing the work of my classmates improved my editing skills by becoming a more precise reader as well as having to describe their mistakes helped me to memorize the right way something should be done.

c. Class discussion is my last aspect of class I felt was most influential. I enjoy talking about projects and assignments with the teacher and fellow students in order to get a good understanding of what is expected as well as develop ideas from the ideas of my classmates.

7. Print Ad Project

My audience, grade school student parents, allowed me to use egos to grab the attention of parents. Trying to tap into the emotional ties a parent has with their child is easy and very helpful. I asked an open ended question “what does your child deserve?” with the picture of a girl trying to read, forces a caring parent to contemplate the educational support their child is receiving.  The design of the ad allowed for the use of powerful visual components such as font size and color and pictures. I think my visual ad turned out pretty well considering my ability as an artist. More sophisticated programs would have allowed me to make a more professional ad. I think I still would have used my drawing but would have uploaded it into a program that could manipulate it and enhance colors and possibly shadows. The very few words in the ad made it easy to revise and I revised my rationale by simply proofreading multiple times searching for sentence errors and anything on the zero tolerance list.

8. BONUS REFLECTION

I feel that what I have learned from this class will without doubt help prevent me from being bamboozled so easily by new texts. From now on I will always wonder who is the intended audience of a work and what are some of its implicit messages. I will also make sure to analyze anything that triggers an emotional response and try to not let my emotions sway my opinions. The study of rhetoric has simply given me confidence as an analyzer. I always felt I could not be bamboozled easily before this course, but now I know and understand the ways to intelligently analyze a work without fearing I am completely wrong.

TO-DO list reflection #5: I learned that I usually learn best through messing up at first and learning from my mistakes and that my motivation comes from my connection with a subject. My new understanding of rhetoric allowed me to analyze my artifacts in a more define and precise way. Following the steps that we were supposed to according to Prof. McCormack’s  instruction allowed me to find my theme while writing instead of trying to figure my theme before I know my examples.  Normally i start from the beginning and work down, this new way was much more efficient. Continually following this new process will definitely help my writing.

PEER REVIEW

Review of John O’Neill’s  Narrative:

Choice of Artifacts: First is a piece that John was very excited and motivated to write and the second a piece from his High School writing that he revised for a college course. Great choices to use in order to show different experiences on his path towards literacy.

Purpose/Theme: Literacy can be achieved through guidance and attaining motivation.

Primary Research: Little to no direct quote or reference from either artifact.

print ad grading of Shantelle

 

 

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Annotated Bibliography

DoSomething.org. (2014). 11 Facts about Literacy in America. Retrieved June 23, 2014, from

https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-literacy-america

This source provides concise and clear data about the literacy epidemic in American schools. The site Dosomething.org is made by young activists trying to educate the public about the impeding literacy problem. They accomplish transparency by providing all of their sources information. This source piggybacks great on the Reading is Fundamental cite by confirming multiple facts as well as providing new ones as well.

Reading is Fundamental. (2014). About RIF. Retrieved June 23, 2014, from

http://www.rif.org/us/about/literacy-facts-and-stats.htm.

This site displays an enormous amount of facts regarding the literacy crisis, some of which were also seen in my first source. The site makes great attempt at focusing on the age groups of children that are illiterate which is what my ad focuses on. As previously stated my first two cites together confirm the legitimacy of each other.

Rummelsberg, Steven J. (2013, June 19). The Literacy Crisis in American Public Schools. Crisis Magazine.

Retrieved June 23, 2014, from http://www.crisismagazine.com/2013/the-literacy-crisis-in-

american-public-schools.

Rummelsberg’s twenty years of experience in the public education system make him an excellent resource for discussing American literacy. He provides powerful ideas and analysis of the crisis. As well as describing it’s origin, addressing the problems and providing a possible solution

KEY TERMS

Reference is a versatile term in the world of academia because of its ability to be both a noun and a verb. A reference can be any type of material, not your own, which provides valuable knowledge that an author chooses to use.  I’m sure that someone from class, possibly myself, asked “Professor, how many references do we need?” Obviously inquiring about the amount of sources we needed for an assignment. The noun and verb uses of the word essentially go hand in hand. To reference, simply means to cite or to give credit. Confusion can occur when using them together for example, “how should I reference this reference?” Or in other words, “how should I give credit to this source?” While a potentially confusing term, if used correctly one will be viewed, at the very least, as competent.

Narrative, as defined by google, can be any story that is told or written. This definition, while being correct, is bland and does not truly personify the vast forms and presentations narration can come in. A narrative can simply be a recording of someone reading or a personal written account of someone’s life.

dialect is a particular form or style of a certain language. Every language takes different forms depending where it is being spoken. In the United States alone there are multiple dialects within each state. Being able to speak in a certain dialect gives someone credibility within a group as well as being able to communicate appropriately.

Tone, like many words, has multiple definitions or uses depending on the context. In a literature context tone is defined as an attitude an author takes towards the subject they’re writing about. There are a multitude if tones an author can display, serious, playful, formal, ironic, etc. If happen to hear the “tone” in a gym though, it would probably be in reference to the definition of one’s body or muscles. To avoid an awkward conversation refrain from bringing up the tone of an author while talking to a meathead at the gym.

Primary source or resource is a text that was made author that is referencing it. A great example of such a resource would be earlier in the class when each student had to refer to multiple pieces of their own work in our literacy narrative papers. This type of source can be easily confused with a secondary source, which is using another person’s idea to prove a point.

A text is usually thought of as an instant message that most people send every day orthe books you dragged around in your bag during high school. To others that are more experienced in rhetoric terms a text simply refers to anything that can be studied. So technically both textbooks and text messages are in fact texts but they both fall in subcategories of texts. Quite literally the way I am explaining and defining text right now is itself a text.

An audience is often thought of as the people who laugh on late night talk shows or everyone watching a movie at the theater. In writing an audience is still very a similar idea. Just like in movies or shows the author is writing to appeal to a particular group of people. The audience is just who the author feels will best receive their ideas and the author writes accordingly.

Logos, my personal favorite way to persuade someone, is the use of logic or reason in order to convince someone of an idea. The use of pathos (emotion) and ethos (reputation) are also important persuaders, but if legitimate logos are present then the other two are unnecessary. The use of logic and reason cannot ever be a bad strategy.

Genres can be defined as a way to categorize any type of artistic composition. Artistic composition can be essentially anything from music to sports to writing. In writing genres can be characterized as requiring specific aspects, such as: form, style, subject, tone, etc.

Implicit messages are those that are not blatantly expressed in a piece of writing. Much like implicit thoughts that are present and have an effect on the thinker they are not apparent. These implicit meanings, if placed and properly executed by the writer, allow the reader to subconsciously form an idea that the writer purposefully meant for them to interpret.

ITERATIVE DRAFTS

To start my Literacy Narrative, analyzing my second artifact is a necessity. My second artifact, I have decided will be my journal from last semesters 101 class.

Draft 1:

The first artifact I chose to use was my initial project in my English 101 course.  The project required me to analyze a quote from the famous John Stuart Mill, a British philosopher, and use it to discuss ideas about personal freedoms in the United States. The quote, “over himself, over his own mind and body, the individual is sovereign” so naturally my paper took the form of a formal persuasive essay, arguing how much personal freedom civilians should have in the U.S. I wrote about some controversial laws like gun control, drug and prostitution illegality.

Personally, I felt that I put very little effort into the paper due to the many restrictions a formal essay demands. I would often become so concerned in my grammar and sentence structure that I did not provide enough attention to my content. The paper was also assigned two days before it was due, which for me is a short time to write, so my grammar suffered as well.  While I received a poor grade I felt my paper completed the prompt at a minimum. The rigid guidelines of an APA style persuasive essay made my paper boring and bland. Also, I feel that kind of paper is the only thing I wrote in High School, so I wasn’t sure how I was supposed to expand as a writer. Of course sentence structure and grammar are necessities to be a good writer; I believe developing intriguing ideas and explanations is the best way to progress in any aspect of life.

To find my second artifact I went back to my English 101 course. For the class I was required to keep a journal and write after every class about any opinions about what had taken place in that days class.  The journal was supposed to be a complete free write where I could voice any ideas or opinions I had about what we had discussed. These journal entries obviously have more than one topic, all of which encompass similar moral and social issues like my initial paper.

Draft 2:

The first artifact I chose to use was my initial project in my English 101 course.  The project required me to analyze a quote from the famous John Stuart Mill, a British philosopher, and use it to discuss ideas about personal freedoms in the United States. The quote, “over himself, over his own mind and body, the individual is sovereign” so naturally my paper took the form of a formal persuasive essay, arguing how much personal freedom civilians should have in the U.S. I wrote about some controversial laws like gun control, drug and prostitution illegality.

Personally, I felt that I put very little effort into the paper due to the many restrictions a formal essay demands. I would often become so concerned in my grammar and sentence structure that I did not provide enough attention to my content. The paper was also assigned two days before it was due, which for me is a short time to write, so my grammar suffered as well.  While I received a poor grade I felt my paper completed the prompt at a minimum. The rigid guidelines of an APA style persuasive essay made my paper boring and bland. Also, I feel that kind of paper is the only thing I wrote in High School, so I wasn’t sure how I was supposed to expand as a writer. Of course sentence structure and grammar are necessities to be a good writer; I believe developing intriguing ideas and explanations is the best way to progress in any aspect of life.

To find my second artifact I went back to my English 101 course. For the class I was required to keep a journal and write after every class about any opinions about what had taken place in that days class.  The journal was supposed to be a complete free write where I could voice any ideas or opinions I had about what we had discussed. These journal entries obviously have more than one topic, all of which encompass similar moral and social issues like my initial paper. These entries also have the same audience as my first artifact even if I knew that my professor would read and access them through a different set of eyes.

The freedom given to me by my professor in this assignment made me feel more in control which inspired me and allowed me to be voice my opinions under no stress. Knowing I would receive credit solely on my effort motivated me to provide more stimulating ideas and substantial relevant evidence. I not only enjoyed this assignment exponentially more I also received a perfect grade, always a nice perk. The fairly new style of writing honestly showed me the fun of writing when there is no pressure and are interested in the topics. Luckily my years of writing throughout my schooling made sure that not all grammar rules were lost.

The similar parameters of these pieces of work allows for an excellent view of my literacy growth through writing in different genres. Justin Vella describes literacy as “a term used to describe ones level of comprehension or understanding in a particular area of study.” By that definition it would seem logical that you experiment in all aspects of a particular area of study in order to become literate in it. Both my success in my journal writing as well as my slight failure in formal writing taught me and expanded my literacy as a writer.

Many great people have said something along the lines of, you learn more about yourself through your failures than your triumphs. I chose my first paper of English 101 after taking that into consideration. A major flaw in that paper was my thesis and how I defended one of its main themes. After struggling to actually choose a thesis of my paper, I eventually decided it was “modern American laws constrict too tightly on certain acts and conversely too loosely on others. To discuss a few, guns, illegal drug use and prostitution are poorly regulated in the United States.” A seemingly decent thesis, yet I did not define exactly what American laws constrict. This simple mistake makes defending my thesis feasibly impossible since it is not specific enough. In my paragraph discussing gun control I make no mention of them constricting any part of American civilian lives. I only continually repeat how dangerous I believe they are and my only piece of, uncited, evidence is “the simple fact that countries where guns are illegal have far fewer murders, especially ones due to guns, should be more than enough to illegalize them here as well” (artifact 1). This pattern of me stating my random opinions and not citing or even supplying any credible evidence continues throughout the paper. When I was not required to cite or provide any evidence arguing the relevance of my ideas, I end up doing so anyway. One entry from my journal evaluating a short story called “the Bet,” I instinctively use an excerpt from the story to explain my thoughts. Trying to explain a change that occurred in one of the main characters of the story while serving a self-imprisonment, I used this quote: “whatever epiphany he had in his cell had showed him that material things were not how one should measure their life” (artifact 2a). Another journal entry of mine was a reflection of the film Grizzly Man. In my reflection I couldn’t help but reference a personal favorite film of mine Into the Wild. The two films were both about men who deserted themselves civilization and said how McCandless, the main character of Into the Wild, also removed himself from society because of his past and his beliefs (artifact 2b).  The effort I put into these different pieces of work, artifact one and two, has taught me multiple things about my own literacy and how I have grown.

After receiving the poor grade for my first paper, I revised the way I wrote and sharpened my grammar skills which are important aspects of writing literacy. My drive to improve helped me to write a much more professional and coherent final paper, another analytical and persuasive piece of academic writing I completed for English 101. The simple triumph as a journal writer also contributed to the greater success I had on my final paper. As I stated earlier the development of intriguing ideas and explanations in order to display literacy in a subject. That particular skill began to blossom after having my ego stroked by the positive assessment given to my journal.

 

Language Tracker

TV/Movie: 2.5 hour movie, Star Trek, scifi lingo and multiple alien languages (only listening)

Video Game: 90 min Motorcycle racing game, mechanic lingo with British accent (only listening)

Roommate talk: 5-6 hours cumulatively, casual and perhaps vulgar at times, cursing (listening & talking)

Teammate talk: 2.5 hours cursing, soccer lingo, giving & receiving instructions (listening & talking)

Text Talk: 6-7 hours cumulatively, shorthand talk, acronyms, emojis (reading and writing)

Classwork

What have I learned so far about rhetorical context?

The context triangle/circle, including text, reader and writer. Every text has Purpose, Audience, Stance, Genre and Media/Form/Design. Stance is the connection between the writer and the text.

PAST WRITING RHETORICAL ANALYSIS

I chose to analyze my first paper from my ENG 101 class last semester. The purpose of this essay was to persuade my audience that certain laws in our society constrict out personal freedoms and relate to a quote by John Stuart Mill. My audience was obviously my 101 professor. I took the stance as myself, an American citizen who has had to abide by the laws I discuss in the paper. My writing fell into the genre of a formal college persuasive essay and I used an academic essay format as the design.

The ethos I used in this essay was that I have been an American citizen my whole life dealing with the laws, that was my only authority on the subject. To persuade my audience using pathos, some examples I used were the fear of guns and our want for freedom. My use of logos can be seen as examples of other societies that have different laws and how their societies function better.

Some explicit details of my paper are that it is a paper explaining three personal freedom issues/ laws that are upheld in the U.S. society. Implicit messages in the paper hint at the idea that without these laws the genreal public would be better off. The extended meaning of my paper is to make the reader question if the laws should be changed in order to accommodate for more personal freedoms.

Do the Right Thing Analysis:

Some explicit details of the scene from “Do the Right Thing,” are simply a large group of black people cooling off in the summer using a fire hydrant who then spray a white/Italian man in his car and then the cops show up to investigate and turn off the hydrant. Implicit messages presented in this scene would be the showing the relationships between the different groups, blacks, white/Italian and the police officers. The extended meaning that Spike Lee possibly was trying to convey was just the tension and lack of respect between the different races and groups of people within NYC.

IN CLASS DIALOGUE

Character activity

Mikey

From Santa Cruz, CA. Long dirty blonde hair, tan. Wearing swim-shorts, flip-flops and rarely wears a shirt.

Speaks “west coast surfer” English. (Dude, brah, man, sweet, rad, gnarly, swell, hella…)

At the beach parking lot with his friends.

IN CLASS AD ANALYSIS 1

The ad my group used in class was an ad for an elderly home.

The purpose was to sell the company’s care. The audience more often than not would be the children of elderly parents or others who wish to provide a comfortable and safe environment for elderly they know. The stance of the ad is to show the services they are providing. Genre of the ad is obviously and advertisement. Medium/design is a newspaper ad.

IN CLASS AD ANALYSIS 2

print+advertising+3

Ethos, pathos and logos are all modes of persuasion that are used in any sort of text.

Ethos is the authority a writer has. It can also be described as their credibility, experience or reputation.

Pathos appeals to the audiences emotions and beliefs.

Logos is the use of logic and factual information in order to persuade the audience.

ADVERTISEMENT ANALYSIS

This ad has very little to no ethos power due to the unfamiliar brand name. They do show their company and product name though. This ad relies mainly on pathos and the feeling that the audience gets when they see the man in the picture. They are showing that with their hair gel you can have crazy, intricate or “cool” hairstyles. There seems to be no logos since there is no actual evidence about why their product is better than any other.

Poetry Attempt

Haiku:

Changing words

thoughts are spread by a

multitude of changing words

no way right nor wrong